Shrubs/Trees
Abutilon
Acalypha
Ardisia (berries)
Azaleas
Bougainvilleas
Brugmansia
Calliandra
Callistemon
Camellia
Clerodendrun
Croton (leaf colour)
Dahlia Imperialis
Dombeya cacuminum
Dombeya burgessiae
Dombeya Ianthotricha
Eremophila
Euphorbia ĎDiamond Frostí
Euphorbia leucocephala
Euphorbia millii
Euphorbia pulcherrima
Grevilleas
Holmskioldia aurea
Hypoestes floribunda
Justicia adhatoda
Justicia aurea
Megakepasma
Montanoa tree daisy (seed heads)
Pycnostachys urticifolia
Reinwardtia indica
Roses
Ruellia colorata
Ruellia macrantha
Ruttya fruticosa
Senecio petasitis
Strelizias
Strobilanthes Goldfussia
Tetradenia riparia




Perennials
Angelonias
Anthurium
Centrantherum punctatum
Cleome
Coleus
Cosmos
Dianthus
Gerberas
Heliotrope
Limonium perezii
Nasturtiums
Otacanthus
Pachystachys
Pelargoniums
Pennisetum Grasses
Peristrophe
Plectranthus
Ruellia macrantha
Russellia
Salvias
Schauria (Miss Milly)
Stachys byzantina
Whitfeldia





Succulents
Aloes
Crassula
Euphorbia millii
Kalanchoe
Zygocactus
















Orchids
Angraecum
Cattleya
Cymbidium
Epidendrum ibaguense
Phalaenopsis
Hardcane Dendrobiums
Vanda
Zygopetalums


Bromeliads
Aechmea
Billbergia
Guzmania
Quesnelia
Vriesia


Bulbs
Chasmanthe
Ornithagallum







Vines
Cobaea scandens
Clerodendrun
Dalechampia
Ipomoea quamoclit
Maurandya barclayana
Pyrostegia venusta















JUSTICIA AUREA
 
 
ALOE
 
PERISTROPHE
 
WHAT IS FEATURING IN THE GARDEN IN JULY:
This winter has seen a lot of colour in the garden with Dombeyas and euphorbias flowering and salvias hanging on later than usual. It is starting to dry out now and we will need to keep an eye on the watering.

THE BIG CUT BACK
July
is the best time to do a big cut back.  Perennials, Shrubs and even small trees that may have got too big.  Salvias, Heliotrope, Pentas, Odontonemas, Tree Dahlias, Tree Begonias, Brazilian Cloak, Hibiscus, Hydrangea,

Stachytarpheta, Tetradenia, Pelargoniums will all have finished flowering. The shrubs need to be well established to require a cut back and be at least a couple of years old.  If you cut them back last year, make sure that you go back to the original stem as each time you cut a stem, the new one is smaller and therefore you get smaller flowers. 

Salvias can be cut back to just above ground level and you will probably see new shoots coming from the base, which next seasons flowers.  I tend to leave a few stalks as support for the new shoots.

Euphorbias pulcherrima and leucocephala, Ruttya, Montanoa Daisy, Holmskioldia can be cut back later in the month when they have past their prime. Costas, Heliconias and Gingers are best left until August, when it is a little warmer

By cutting back over a longer period your garden will start rejuvenating and not look so bare all at once.

Mulch all these cuttings and put the lighter material straight them back onto the garden.  If you have an irrigation system, check it and do any repairs or installations before you mulch.  Use a mulcher or chipper (for larger materials).  There is no need to let the mulch compost and wait for it to break down; simply put it straight back onto the garden and it will break down and suppress weeds at the same time.
Mulch with sugar cane mulch or lucerne as well if you donít have enough mulching material to go around.  I mulch quite thickly, about 7 cms as I only do an area yearly.

You can also use some of the cuttings for propagation, to give away or use in the garden later.  Even though it is cold, they will still take if kept in a sheltered area such as a bush house and kept moist. 

Tree Dahlias and Daisies are propagated by cutting the canes into about 1 metre lengths and placing them upright in a 20cm pot with the bottom end sitting on the base of the pot and then filling the pot with sandy loam. Make sure that there is a node in the soil.  If they are good fat canes only put one in per pot.

VEGETABLES will need constant water and it is a good idea to plant seedlings monthly to keep a succession of vegetables to harvest.  Seedlings of root vegetables, Brassicas, Snow peas, Beans, Silverbeet, Onions and Tomatoes.

It is important that the beds are well manured, mulched and watered consistently to keep the vegetables growing well. Asparagus goes into dormancy over winter and needs to be cut right back, manured and mulched ready for the spring sprouting.

ALOES are putting on a wonderful show and are great for tough areas like slopes that have good drainage.  They need full sun and don't need mulching.  They are easily divided once the flowers have finished.  The flowers are much loved by the birds.

GREVILLEAS are also putting on a great show and will continue flowering right through the winter months.  It is important to plant the 'Queensland' varieties which not only tolerate our conditions well but are loved by the birds and insects.  I find that they do appreciate mulch and really enjoyed the wet summer as long as drainage is excellent.

ORCHIDS
Cattleyas are putting on a beautiful show as are Cymbidiums, Phalaenopsis, Hardcane Dendrobiums and Zygopetalums.  Donít be tempted to over water orchids in winter.  A misting daily is better than a heavy watering and this should be directed onto their leaves.  Mist them in the mornings so that they are dry by nightfall as they hate being cold and wet.

Make sure that the temperature doesnít drop below 10 deg Celsius for the Hardcane Dendrobiums and Phalaenopsis Orchids.  We keep ours in an orchid house which is not heated but manage to keep it at that temperature by closing it up at night and growing ferns and other plants, therefore creating a micro-climate with extra humidity that these beauties enjoy all year round.

Good Gardening
Jan
 
THIS MONTH
IN THE GARDEN
with Jan

JULY
GREVILLEA COASTAL DAWN
CATTLEYA ORCHID
SENICIO PETASITIS
Let nature be your guide
TETRADENIA RIPARIA